Recipe: Veal Fricassee, White Veal Stew

We’ll be bringing a monthly recipe feature from a wonderful blog called Crumbs and Tales by a talented foodie named Nasma Haider! Please read more about Nasma in her bio at the bottom of her recipe. This month, she shares with you her Veal Fricassee recipe!

Veal Fricassee

Fricassee [FRICK•a•see] is a classic French stew dish in which poultry or meat is first seared in fat, and then braised with liquid. The meat, however, is not braised according to the traditional technique of braising. The meat in a veal fricassee is not browned before the braising liquid is added. Instead, the meat is cooked in oil or fat but at a lower temperature, so that the meat stays white. This recipe is finished with a touch of cream to give it a beautiful white finish, but you can leave it out if you wish.

Veal Fricassee

  • 2 pounds veal, cut into 2 inch cubes
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil
  • 5 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 14-18 small pearl onions or 1 large onion
  • 8 ounces white button mushrooms
  • 1 large carrot
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 7 cups beef broth (or water with 1 beef bouillon cube)
  • 1 bouquet garni of fresh rosemary and thyme
  • 1 teaspoon (15 ml) fresh lemon juice
  • 6 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, to garnish
  • salt and pepper, to taste (if necessary)

Prepare the stew: Wash the veal pieces, and then pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle the pieces of meat with salt and pepper. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter with the oil in a large cast iron pot over medium heat. Add half of the veal pieces and cook for 4-5 minutes, turning occasionally. Sweat the meat but do not brown it. Remove the cooked pieces of veal from the pot and set aside. Warm 2 more tablespoons of butter in the pot and add the remaining pieces of veal. Cook for 4-5 minutes then remove from pot and set aside. (Always cook the meat in two batches so as not to overcrowd the pot.) Dice the onions (if not using pearl onions) and carrots and slice the mushroom. Add the onions, mushrooms, and carrots to the pot (there is no need to wipe the pot clean — the leftover pieces of meat and brown bits will flavour the vegetables). Add the last tablespoon of butter to coat the vegetables. Sweat the vegetables for a minute or two. Sprinkle the vegetable mixture with flour and stir to combine. Return the veal to the pot, nestling the pieces of meat between the vegetables. Add the beef broth, and bring the liquid to a boil. Add the bouquet garni. Cover and simmer over medium heat for about 45 minutes or until the veal is tender.

Prepare the ‘Liaison’ (sauce thickener): whisk together egg yolks and cream in a medium bowl. Whisking constantly, remove 1/2 cup of the warm cooking liquid from the pot and add it, 1 tablespoon at a time, into the liaison to temper it. (If you add the eggs and cream directly to the pot, the egg will cook and curdle). Stir tempered liaison into pot.

Add the lemon juice and chopped parsley to the pot (reserving a small sprinkling of parsley to garnish the dish) and combine. If desired, salt and pepper the dish further, to taste. Garnish dish with remaining parsley. Serve warm with crusty, delicious French bread.

For the full step-by-step recipe, visit her blog!

 

Nasma Haider is the owner of ‘Frost Confection & Cupcake Couture’ (www.FrostConfections.com | www.facebook.com/frostcupcake), a confectionary company which specializes in custom candy tables and dessert bars. After completing a law degree, she went on to continue to channel her love of food by creating gorgeous desserts and gourmet confections for family, friends, and clients.

Inspired by her love of entertaining and penchant for creating beautiful food, she later started a food blog (www.CrumbsandTales.com) to introduce gourmet and everyday recipes to fellow foodies, for which she writes, cooks, styles, and photographs the recipes which she has developed and amassed over the years.

Web: www.frostconfections.com
Twitter: @cupcakesbyfrost | @crumbsandtales
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/crumbsandtales 
Food Blog: www.crumbsandtales.com

By: June 21, 2013

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